Week 7—Oct. 17 & 19

In Class:
-Assignment 1 feedback
Exposition, Anecdote, and Moment of Reflection: Building blocks of multimedia storytelling
Online Video Tips and Techniques
Video set up for Canon T5i and Rode mic
Final Cut Pro X basics
“Why Journalism?” in-class video assignment (worth 30 quiz points)

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Week 6—Oct. 10 & 12

In Class:
-We will start with QUIZ 1 then finish  in-class Storify Project. What worked? What was challenging? What did you learn about your own assignment?
-Assignment 1 questions and feedback
-Reading review. “What is your takeaway?” from the following:

WNYC’s Being 12 project overview
Exposition, Anecdote, and Moment of Reflection: Building blocks of multimedia storytelling
Equipment check out for Journalism courses
Online Video Tips and Techniques
Video set up for Canon T5i and Rode mic
Final Cut Pro X basics
-“Why Journalism?” in-class video assignment (worth 30 quiz points)

Assignments:
Assignment 1: Event due Wed. Oct.19 before start of class
-Read The web video problem by Adam Westbrook
-Read How to make boring things interesting in video by Adam Westbrook
-Watch Ira Glass on Storytelling: Part 1
-Review T5i and Final Cut Pro X tutorials so you are ready to start working next class.

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Week 5—Oct. 3 & 5

In Class:
-Finish verification project
-Work on in-class Storify Project (Worth 15 quiz points)
-One-on-one feedback on workflow for Assignment 1
-We might start shooting video in class next week. In case we do bring your equipment (headphones, memory card, flashdrive) to class on Monday and for the next three weeks.
-Your Assignment 1 workflow should be posted by now. Questions?
How to submit Assignment 1: Event
-Reading review. “What is your takeaway?” from the following:

WNYC’s Being 12 project overview

Assignments:
-Watch Being 12: Intro
-Watch Being 12: If you give a 12-year-old a phone
-Watch Being 12: What romance is like in middle school
-Watch Being 12: On race
-Read The web video problem by Adam Westbrook
-Read How to make boring things interesting in video by Adam Westbrook

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In-Class Storify Assignment Fall 2016

Worth 15 quiz points

Your assignment is to curate a summary of a news story using Storify.

You have three story choices. Pick one.

1. This past Monday saw one of the most popular political events in U.S. history—the presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. Curate a story that gathers the most interesting aspects of the lead-up to the debates, highlights from the debate itself, and the aftermath for the candidates and their supports. What were the high and low points? What made these debates so popular? Did it impact poll numbers for either candidate?

2. This summer the Olympics were held in Rio, and there was a lot of controversy surrounding the choice. Curate a story that examines this controversy. Why were people against holding the Olympics in Rio? Was it because of Zika? Was it economic or ecological in nature? Who were some of the loudest voices of opposition? How did social media play a role? Did it impact Olympic competition or viewership? And after all was said and done, did this controversy have any lasting impact on the games? Did everything go smoothly or were their hiccups?

3. A UCLA gymnast named Sophina DeJesus inserted hip-hop dance moves into her floor routine at a competition over last year. A video of it generated a lot of interest and comments on social media. Who is she? What did she do? Why is this interesting? How is the gymnastics world reacting? How is the wider sports world reacting?

Storify is just the tool for doing this. The main goal of the assignment is to practice the key aspects of journalistic curation, including how to:

  • Identify essential pieces information
  • Verify sources and check facts
  • Provide context to social media posts
  • Assemble a summary or narrative of a news story that makes sense of a chaotic bunch of information
  • Play to the strengths of individual media elements (text, photos, sound, video, graphics) to create the most compelling content
  • Pay attention to contiguity – how individual media elements (text, photos, sound, video, graphics) relate to each other

For this curation assignment, you are required to (and be graded on):

Include at least six (6) sources from at least three (3) different social media platforms(Twitter, Facebook, Google News, YouTube, etc).

Include at least two (2) visuals – photos, video or both. Each visual must be relevant and provide valuable insight or information to your topic.

Verify each source of information that you include in your Storify. Each source included needs to be credible and directly relevant to your topic. For example, with a Twitter source, look at their previous tweets and look at the information they are sharing. The profile information on a social media account should be clear. Would you be able to contact this source for more information or verification?

Fact-check each key piece of information by confirming it from another source.

Write text summaries that cover the five Ws. If your social media elements need explanation, clarification or connection you must write that in the space above them. For example, they can further explain the ideas from your social media elements, explain how different items are connected, and/or introduce the ideas from the elements and where they are from.

Write a compelling headline and a short summary at the top of your Storify. Your headline should include key words for search, convey the main point of your Storify, and be compel the reader to continue.

Your completed Storify should summarize the key aspects of story, provide compelling social media content, and provide links to learn more.

Get started:

  1. Before you start, read Storify’s top tips for curating with ease.
  2. Go to Storify.com to sign up for an account. If you log in with a Twitter or FB account it will connect to those accounts.
  3. Click on New Story button.
  4. This will take you to the “Create a Story” screen. The left-hand side is where you build the story and the right-hand side of the screen contains a list of social media elements. You can search for content from Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, Google, RSS feeds and there’s also an option to paste in specific urls. The “+” sign at the right will reveal more options.
  5. Use the search features to find the best information from different sources. You can explore them and then drag and drop into your timeline.
  6. You can add text to introduce individual media elements or to advance the summary or narrative.
  7. You can rearrange the order of your elements as you go.
  8. When you are finished compiling your Storify, write your headline and 100 word summary at the top.
  9. Hit “Publish” (blue button at the top of the toolbar)
  10. Email me a link to your Storify.

(This assignment was adapted from resources by Millerbh and Kelly Fincham)

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Week 4—Sept. 26 & 28

In class:
-Get access to ruoj2roughdraft.wordpress.com
–Finish Lecture: The art of story hunting
Reviewing some basics: Headlines, featured image, formatting, and hyperlinks
Curation as Journalism
Verification as Journalism
-Curating with Storify (In-class assignment – Worth 15 quiz points)
-Discuss Billy Penn and the readings from last week

Assignments:
Read the following for Wednesday:
-How AJ+ reported from Baltimore using only mobile phones (Poynter)
-Read How to grow a social media community from scratch (NPR)
-Read Get a Twitter habit: 5 things to do every day until it sticks (NPR)
-Read How to tell powerful narratives on Instagram (Nieman Storyboard)
-Read Here’s how 6 news orgs are thinking about the chat app (Nieman Lab)
-Read Storify’s top tips for curating with ease (Storify)

Working on Assignment 1: Event due Wed. Oct.19

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Reimagining Football Story—Fall 2016

  1. Who is the audience for this football story?
    -football fans
    -other teams in same conference
    -students
    -alumni
    -Glassboro Residents
    -coaches and players
    -faculty
    -family and friends of players
    -scouts
  2. How do you reach this audience? Where do they gather (in person and online)?
    -advertise in the student center and main buildings (flyers, etc.)
    -post to Rowan’s athletic Twitter feed
    -Facebook fan pages for Rowan football
    -start your own Twitter hashtag for the game
    -make announcements in your classes about game coverage
    -tailgates/pre-game parties
  3. List the kind of information/content/forms of media you think students want on this game?
    -video hi lights
    -Rowan player stats
    -history between the two teams
    -how much tickets cost/parking/giveaways at the game
    -live Tweets
    -preview of what to expect (predictions, players doing well, etc.)
    -interviews with coaches
    -interviews with players about pre-game mentality
    -info on big plays, turning points, score updates
    -photos of the players while playing
    -photos of fan reactions
    -Rowan’s schedule and rank (who playing in future)
    -serious on-field injuries
    -quotes/interviews from opposition
    -what did this game mean (playoffs?)
    -important questionable calls
    -halftime punditry
  4. For each of the items above in question 3: When do students want this information? (i.e., day before, day of game, day after, etc?)
    -pre-game mentality of players the day before
    -week before posting bits of info daily
    -day before: info on time/place/ticket cost
    -hours leading up to game: punditry, fan expectations/emotions, players pre-game
    -live updates/plays should go out DURING the game
    -immediately after: who won, who played next week, key stats, key players
    -during the game: photos as they happen, score updates after each quarter
    -day or two before: mentality of players during practice
    -during: live video or periscope
    -after game interviews wit players/coaches
  5. For each of the items listed above in question 3: What is the best way to get this information to them (i.e., Twitter, posted on a website, in print, etc?)
    -Twitter
    -Facebook
    -Instagram
    -SnapChat
    -Facebook Live
    -Periscope

BEFORE:
-gather info about the teams: try to find most interesting aspects of both teams
-develop hashtag for game updates
-let people know about hashtag/live Tweeting
-interview players about thoughts on the game
-go to a practice. get info from players/coaches (also take photos/videos/live tweet)
-Throwback Thursday: ask fans to post throwback photos from previous Rowan games
-compilation video of great games from last season
-ask fans to tweet questions for players/coaches during/after the game
-daily countdown on Instagram few days before with photos
-gather video of fans and their thoughts on the game

DURING:
-get video of national anthem (politically topical)
-Tweet play by play
-quarter by quarter updates
-fana send selfies at the game (use the hashtag)
-interview fans at the half/get reactions/thoughts
-Periscope or FaceBook live during the game: fan interviews, talk during halftime about how it’s going so far,
-take video/photos of band/halftime show
-geotag Snapchat post video/pics
-injury updates

AFTER:
-post game interviews: use video for emotion post to Twitter/Snapchat/Facebook; edit a short audio montage of intervies
-photo gallery: post 15/20 interesting photos with captions the next day
-video montage of game highlights (next day)
-when you post full game story online embed tweets
-Post favorite fan photos of the game
-ask for fan predictions about next week based on this game
-hyperlink your tweets to specific game events/moments
-ask for fan votes on MVP
-write 750 story about the game: post it online the day after on your blog, Twitter (linked), etc.

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Week 3—Sept. 19 and 21

In class:
-Finish discussion about the football game workflow
-Get access to ruoj2roughdraft.wordpress.com
-More about Assignment 1: Event (Examples: Fishtown Street Food Festival and Madonna in AC)
Lecture: The art of story hunting
How to pitch a story for this class (the “XY And what’s interesting test”)
Pitch for Assignment 1 due on Wednesday. Once it’s approved you can start working on your workflow.

Reading Review:
-Explore BillyPenn.com, a local, digital-only publication and OJA finalist. What does a digital-first strategy look like at this publication? Come with examples.
-Read How Philly’s Billy Penn is building a local news audience from scratch (NiemanLab)
-Read Inside Billy Penn with CEO Jim Brady (AJR)
-Read How a digital-first workflow guides a reporter’s work by Steve Buttry
-Read 10 ways to think like a digital journalist by Steve Buttry
-Read NPR’s Emily Harris made this checklist to organize her story process (NPR)

Reading Assignments:
-Watch Ira Glass on Storytelling Part 2 and Part 3
-How AJ+ reported from Baltimore using only mobile phones (Poynter)
-Read How to grow a social media community from scratch (NPR)
-Read Get a Twitter habit: 5 things to do every day until it sticks (NPR)
-Read How to tell powerful narratives on Instagram (Nieman Storyboard)
-Read Here’s how 6 news orgs are thinking about the chat app (Nieman Lab)
Quiz #1 reading and lectures next Wednesday

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